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1836 Louisa Plant

She was tried along with Thomas Birchenough for the murder of their infant child Edward, in Macclesfield, through murder by arsenic poisoning. It was evidenced that Louisa had administered the poison, which she claimed was given to her by Thomas. The jury found Louisa Guilty of murder, with a reccomendation to mercy because of her age, and found Thomas not guilty of murder, but guilty of being an accessory. The judge stated that this was the same as an aquital, but that he should be tried as an accessory before the fact, which took place the following morning, and he was found guilty. Both were sentenced to death, although Louisa’s sentence was immediately commuted, and Thomas’ solicitor had raised legal objections, which led to him being transported for life.

1836 Thomas Birchenough

He was tried along with Louisa Plant for the murder of their infant child Edward, in Macclesfield, through murder by arsenic poisoning. It was evidenced that Louisa had administered the poison, which she claimed was given to her by Thomas. The jury found Louisa Guilty of murder, with a reccomendation to mercy because of her age, and found Thomas not guilty of murder, but guilty of being an accessory. The judge stated that this was the same as an aquital, but that he should be tried as an accessory before the fact, which took place the following morning, and he was found guilty. Both were sentenced to death, although Louisa’s sentence was immediately commuted, and Thomas’ solicitor had raised legal objections, which led to him being transported for life.

1841 Ann Rathbone

Ann Rathbone was born 2 Feb. 1817 at Broken Crop, Maccesfield. Description 4 ft. 7 in. sallow complexion head small, light brown hair face slightly pockpitted no front teeth. violent temper.
She was convicted of the murder of her infant female child by cutting its throat, at the Pack Horse Inn in Macclesfield, where she lived.
She was transported for life, and had three children in Australia

1830 Thomas Hassell

Unusualy for this period Thomas Hassell was convicted of Murder, and then his sentence was commuted to transportation.
On the night of 26th July 1830 an altercation broke out late in the evening outside the Phoenix, a public house owned by Joseph Chesters. 19 year old Hassell, aolong with a friend were a bit worse for wear, and refusing to pay back a debt he owed to John Chesters. Following a bit of pushing and shoving, Hassells stabbed Sarah Chester, who presumably tried to help breaking up the fight.
There were numerous witnesses to the incident, and Hassells was tried at the Cheshire Summer Assizes, and found guilty, with a reccomendation to mercy on account of his age, and previous good character.
He was sentenced to hang on 6th September, although the sentence was respited whilst appeals were made. Sentence was commuted, and he was transported for life.
He sailed on the ‘Exmouth’ departing on 3rd March 1831, and arriving in New South Wales on 28th July, 1831, along with 289 other convicts.

Harold Neville Potts 1945

Potts was convicted of the murder of both his parents, Leonard and Mabel on 17th June 1945, at their home in Chester Road, Poynton. Potts was in charge of a local Army Cadet group, and was keen to take up a career in the armed forces, which his father disagreed with. On returning home from a night out, he had a further argument with his father as he was late home. Potts had been allowed to bring home various weapons from his Cadet base, including a sten gun and ammunition, which he used to shoot his parents when they were in bed. He then fininshed them off with a hammer.
Too young to be sentenced to death, he was sentenced to be detained until the pleasure of his majesty be known

Alfred Ernest Derrick 1910

Convicted for the murder of Hannah Mary Etchells with whom he was having an affair. He was a native of Exeter, where he had a wife and children, and on 21st May he went for an evening walk with Hannah. She was later found dead, having been strangled, with a leather belt around her neck. He was found nearby with superficial wounds to his neck. He later claimed they had a row, and he walked off, returning later to find her dead, and he tried to kill himself. The previous year he had been found guilty of not paying upkeep for his wife and 3 children.
Sentenced to death, his appeal also failed, but he was reprieved in August 1910